Juke Joints & Nightclubs

The Mississippi Blues Mamas have spent many a fun night at music venues with bands they represented.

A few photos from our archives - around 2005 - 2012

Po Monkeys 2009
Notice the monkeys everywhere. Ron and Carol visiting early afternoon as band set up.
Po Monkey's 2009
Po Monkey's was located in a cotton field by the side of the road.
Po Monkeys - Peggy Brown
Before it was renovated inside for tour groups. Peggy Brown on the steps
Queen of Hearts Owner Chellie B. Lewis
The Queen of Hearts located in Jackson, MS. with a rich history.
Queen of Hearts
Nice line-up of bands.
Nelson Street 2011 with T-Model Ford
Always fun to be with T-Model Ford.
Walnut Street Blues Bar, Mickey Rogers
Walnut Street Blues Bar - Mickey Rogers
David Lee Durham at 930 Blues Club (5)
David Lee Durham and band from Indianola, MS.
King Edward at 930 Blues Club
King Edward and Band always put on a great show.
Houserockers @ Frank Jones Corner
Large band in a small space performing all night long.
308 Blues Club,Dubtonic Kru, Mickey Rogers, Jesse Robinson
Dubtonic Kru band from Jamaica performing in Indianola, MS
Billy Branch, 308 Club, Indianola, MS
Billy Branch in the Mississippi Delta putting on a great blues show with the Mickey Rogers Band in Indianola, MS.
Cash McCall, Ground Zero, Clarksdale, MS
Cash McCall performing at Ground Zero.
Dennis Fountain, L.D.s Kitchen, Vicksburg, MS
Another fun night in Vicksburg, MS
Gene Simmons, Carol Marble at GZ
Backstage at Ground Zero with Gene Simmons who was in town filming a tv show.
Morgan Freeman, Bill Lucket with musicians
A group of the musicians who performed regularly at Ground Zero Blues Club, pictured with Morgan Freeman and Bill Luckett.
Jimmi Mayes, Mickey Rogers at Ground Zero
Jimmi Mayes and Mickey Rogers at Ground Zero Blues Club.
Club Ebony 2009
Mickey Rogers Band with Eden Brent performing. A Blues Jam
David Lee Durham 2005, Club Ebony
Sunday night blues at Club Ebony in 2005.
Hal and Mal's
Christmas Party with musicians from the Delta and Jackson on stage together.
Alphonso Sanders and Jesse Robinson
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Po' Monkey's was a juke joint in unincorporated Bolivar County, Mississippi, United States, outside of Merigold. The juke joint was founded in the early 1960s and was one of the last rural juke joints in the Mississippi Delta. It ceased operating after the death of operator Willie "Po' Monkey" Seaberry in 2016. While many such jukes once dotted the cotton fields of the Delta countryside, Po’ Monkey’s was one of the relatively few to survive into the 21st century.

The Queen of Hearts, a primary venue for down-home blues in Jackson, opened at this location in the 1970s. During the following decades, owner-operator Chellie B. Lewis presented the blues bands of King Edward, Sam Myers, Big Bad Smitty, and many others. The house behind the club at 905 Ann Banks Street was owned and occupied in the 1960s by blues singer-guitarist Johnnie Temple, who had been a popular recording artist in Chicago in the 1930s and ‘40s.

Walnut Street Blues Bar, on Walnut Street, Greenville, MS is in the historic downtown area of Greenville, MS. Live music and good food. Owned by Danny and Sharon Peoples. Blues Walk memorial is located on Walnut Street. Mississippi Delta Blues, Inc. musicians performed in this club on a regular basis.

Nelson Street Greenville, MS Nelson Street was once the epicenter of African American business and entertainment in the Delta. Nightclubs, cafes, churches, groceries, fish markets, barbershops, laundries, record shops, and other enterprises did a bustling trade. Famous blues clubs on the street included the Casablanca, the Flowing Fountain, and the Playboy Club. Willie Love saluted the street in his 1951 recording "Nelson Street Blues." Near the Walnut Street Blues Bar.

 

Subway Lounge – Jackson, MS During the era of segregation, traveling African Americans had few options for lodging. In Jackson, many black musicians stayed at the Summers Hotel, established in 1944 by W.J. Summers. In 1966 Summers opened a club in the hotel basement that he called the Subway Lounge. The Subway was a regular jazz venue and offered popular late-night blues shows from the mid-1980s until the hotel’s demolition in 2004.

930 Blues Café Mississippi has such a unique history and culture of blues music, why would Jackson, the state capitol, not have a venue to recognize it? That is exactly what Isaac Byrd Jr., owner of the 930 Blues Café, thought. "I saw all of the venues of blues in New Orleans and Memphis and noticed that Jackson didn't have one. As the capitol, we need one so that we can expose the best of the blues that is seen in other parts of the country," he said in an interview. In order to introduce the blues, Byrd put his thoughts together and opened the 930 Café in January 2002. The 930 Blues Café highlights musicians from all over, especially those who don't get the true recognition that they deserve. Along with Bell and Ironing Board Sam, many other talented musicians have performed here, including Michael Burk and Chuck Willis. "It has become a popular tourism spot," Byrd said. "I am able to bring people together to have fun. We are here to relax and enjoy good Delta blues."

At first glance, the café looks like another nice home in downtown Jackson. Without looking inside—at least not before 9:30 p.m. when the music cranks up—one would never know of the incredible blues experience harbored here. (Jackson Free Press 2005)

Frank Jones Corner FJC is in downtown Jackson on Farish Street.  It is a late-night bar that really kicks off around midnight.  It is one of the few spots in Jackson that is helping to keep the blues music scene alive.  As many have indicated in their reviews, this is a spot that goes late (after other bars shut down). 

308 Blues Club, Indianola, MS on Depot Street is just down the street from Club Ebony which made it easy for blues fans to walk back and forth between the venue during special events.

Ground Zero Blues Club is a blues club in Clarksdale, Mississippi that is co-owned by Morgan Freeman, attorney Bill Luckett, and Memphis entertainment executive Howard Stovall. It got its name from the fact that Clarksdale has been historically referred to as "Ground Zero" for the blues. It opened in May 2001 and is located near the Delta Blues Museum. In the style of juke joints, 

LD’s Kitchen, 1111 Mulberry Street, Vicksburg, MS offers restaurant, bar, and live music. Has offered live music on a regular basis. The Central Mississippi Blue Monday Band performed there regularly.

Club Ebony, Indianola, MS – Club Ebony, one of the South’s most important African American nightclubs, was built just after the end of World War II by Indianola entrepreneur Johnny Jones (1907-1950). Under Jones and successive owners, the club showcased Ray Charles, Count Basie, B.B. King, Bobby Bland, Little Milton, Albert King, Willie Clayton and many other legendary acts. When owner Mary Shepard retired in 2008 after 34 years here, B.B. King purchased the venue to keep the vaunted Club Ebony tradition alive.”​

Club Ebony, Indianola, MS  – Club Ebony, one of the South’s most important African American nightclubs, was built just after the end of World War II by Indianola entrepreneur Johnny Jones (1907-1950). Under Jones and successive owners, the club showcased Ray Charles, Count Basie, B.B. King, Bobby Bland, Little Milton, Albert King, Willie Clayton and many other legendary acts. When owner Mary Shepard retired in 2008 after 34 years here, B.B. King purchased the venue to keep the vaunted Club Ebony tradition alive.”

Hal and Mal’s, Jackson, MS was conceived by brothers Hal and Malcolm White. the dream was rooted in a childhood on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, reinforced by years of living and working in New Orleans, and ultimately launched in Jackson in 1985. This gathering place has always been owned and operated by family – now the second and third generations. The multifunctional, southern-soul-soaked rooms are adorned with memorabilia and chock-full of local character; each one also features a stage for live music. The kitchen serves a steady offering of hearty regional staples with a nod toward the Gulf of Mexico. Hal and Mal’s is the most-talked-about upscale honky-tonk in all of Mississippi, where art is made, music plays, and folks gather to share community and celebrate the best of Mississippi’s creative spirit. –  from The Artful Evolution of Hal & Mal’s

© 2019 by  Mississippi Blues Mamas 

Nelson Street 2011 with T-Model Ford

Always fun to be with T-Model Ford.